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Abstract Detail



Genetics Section

Wicke, Susann [1], Mueller, Kai [1].

Characterization and comparative analyses of repetitive DNA in Lentibulariaceae, a carnivorous family with the smallest angiosperm genomes.

The genomes of flowering plants are remarkably dynamic with up to 2056-fold differences in genome size. Besides the rampant occurrence of polyploidy, the proliferation or reduction of repetitive DNA with various transposable elements and satellite DNAs account for much of the size variation. Genome downsizing often coincides with an idiosyncratic loss of the diversity of repeat DNA families, suggesting that minimal genomes may harbor substantial alterations regarding the composition of high and medium repetitive DNA. Here, we investigate and characterize the genome composition of Genlisea, which possesses the smallest genome among angiosperms. Using whole-genome shotgun pyrosequencing, graph-based sequence clustering, and a resampling scheme to account for dissimilar dataset sizes, we compare the repeat DNA fraction of Genlisea to representatives of its carnivorous relatives in the bladderwort family (Lentibulariaceae) and non-carnivorous sister groups. Above that, we trace the intraspecific and intergeneric evolution of the most abundant repetitive elements and provide the first insights into the evolution of transposons and retrotransposon families in minimal angiosperm genomes.

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1 - Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Muenster, Huefferstr. 1, Muenster, 48149, Germany

Keywords:
genome evolution
repetitive DNA
transposons
retrotransposons
Genlisea
Lentibulariaceae.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 6
Location: Marlborough B/Riverside Hilton
Date: Monday, July 29th, 2013
Time: 10:30 AM
Number: 6007
Abstract ID:119
Candidate for Awards:Margaret Menzel Award


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